Adjective Forms & Second-Declension Nouns
Episode 6 of Greek 101

Adjective Forms & Second-Declension Nouns
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First-Declension Nouns
Episode 2 of Greek 101
Discover that Greek nouns have gender and their endings supply a host of information, such as whether the case is nominative, genitive, dative, or accusative--a function usually performed by word order or prepositions in English. Begin with the eight noun endings of the primarily feminine first declension.
First-Declension Masculine Nouns
Episode 11 of Greek 101
Although first declension nouns are generally feminine, some masculine nouns also fall into this class. Learn how to recognize them (as well as the declensions of all nouns) from the nominative and genitive forms supplied in Greek dictionaries. Then investigate some finer points of compound verbs.
Third-Declension Nouns
Episode 13 of Greek 101
Encounter the third and final declension, focusing, as usual, on the genitive, which is the key to identifying the declension. This is especially important with the third declension, since the noun base is not obvious from the nominative form. Then make your final preparations to read Homer's Iliad in unadapted…
First- & Second-Declension Pronouns
Episode 8 of Greek 101
Delve deeper into the first and second declensions, discovering that the endings for demonstrative adjectives and pronouns differ in only minor ways from those for nouns. Practice using different types of pronouns, and learn that they underwent a fascinating evolution from Homeric Greek to Koine.
Third-Declension Adjectives
Episode 28 of Greek 101
In the next four lessons, return to the declension of adjectives and pronouns to explore variations on patterns you have already practiced. In this lesson, focus on third-declension adjectives. Close by reading lines 64-69 of the Iliad. Also learn about a handy class of words called particles.
Additional Patterns of the First Declension
Episode 4 of Greek 101
Look at two variations in the pattern of the first declension--one used in Homeric Greek and the other in Koine, the Greek of the New Testament. Despite being separated by almost a thousand years, the two dialects have remarkable continuity.
Demonstrative Adjectives & Pronouns
Episode 29 of Greek 101
Investigate the use of Greek demonstrative adjectives and pronouns, which correspond to English words such as this, that, these, and those. Chart a rich sampling of demonstratives, including a reflexive pronoun, in Luke 23:28-29. Then continue with the heightening tension in lines 70-75 of the Iliad.
Forming and Using Infinitives
Episode 19 of Greek 101
Study the fifth principal part, which forms the basis of the perfect and pluperfect middle/passive, and the sixth and final principal part, which forms the basis of the aorist passive. Then learn how to construct the infinitive in different tenses, looking at examples in Homer and the New Testament.
Greek 101 - Learning an Ancient Language
Discover beauty that no translation can capture, and get direct access to a remarkable heritage. Learn ancient Greek with an innovative professor using two great masterworks: Homer's Iliad and the New Testament. Covering the topics in a typical year of introductory college-level ancient Greek, Greek 101 exposes you to authentic…
The Greek Alphabet & Pronunciation
Episode 1 of Greek 101
Learn the 24 letters of the Greek alphabet using the restored classical pronunciation, recognizing that there was some variation in pronunciation in the ancient world. Practice the pairings of vowels called diphthongs, and sound out a selection of words that you will soon be reading in sentences.
Basic Rules of Greek Accentuation
Episode 3 of Greek 101
Invented over two thousand years ago by Aristophanes of Byzantium, head of the Library of Alexandria, accents are important clues to the pronunciation of Greek words, and they often provide other crucial information. Learn the rules for the three types of accents: acute, grave, and circumflex.
Verbs in the Present Tense
Episode 5 of Greek 101
Greek verbs can be described in terms of person, number, tense, voice, and mood. In this lesson, focus on verbs that are present active indicative. Learn that voice, person, and number are indicated by endings on the verb base. For the present tense, these are called primary endings.