Archaeology
The Series that Rewrites History

Archaeology - The Series that Rewrites History
Show More

13 videos in this playlist

Archaeology: Fall of the MAYA
Twenty-five years ago, the ancient Mayans were thought to be a mysterious and peaceful people governed by astronomer-priests. But in 1965, Russian linguist Yuri Knorosov cracked the phonetic code of…
Archaeology: The Death March of de Soto
Romantic visions of the Explorer Hernando de Soto continue to celebrate the conquistador's arrival in North America 450 years ago as one of the most important events in the history…
Archaeology: The Search for Neanderthal
In 1856, workmen in a cave in the Neander valley near Dussseldorf, Germany, unearthed a human skeleton. Its skull had a low, protruding brow, large teeth, and a massive bone…
Archaeology: The Lost City of Zimbabwe
Rising out of the highlands of Sub-Saharan Africa are the ruins of the long-secluded, spectacular Great Zimbabwe. Dismissed by racist explorers as the work of some ancient black civilization and…
Archaeology: Unraveling Hitler's Conspiracy
The Nazi's doctrine was clear: They, the Aryans, were a superior race, as they had demonstrated in their heroic past. Every effort must therefore be made to guarantee the genetic…
Archaeology: Secrets of the Little Bighorn
One of America's most famous historical landmarks is The Little Bighorn, a site where Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and more than 250 troopers of the 7th US Calvary rode…
Archaeology: Who were the Israelites?
The tale of the Israelites' conquest of the Promised Land has long been an article of faith wherever the Bible is widely read and respected. But recent discoveries suggest that…
Archaeology: The Voyage of the Vikings
During the Middle Ages, in a period spanning 800 AD to 1100 AD, a powerful, seafaring people known as the Vikings came swarming out of the northlands in their predatory…
Archaeology: Caesar's Nightmare: An Ambush in the Forest
Sweeping aside nearly 2,000 years of doubt and mystery, on-going excavations in Germany's Teutoberg Forest have revealed the location of one of the bloodiest battles of antiquity. In 9 AD,…
Archaeology: Ancient People of the Desert
Southeastern Utah is one of the richest and least disturbed archaeological areas in the Southwest. In 1990, archaeologists in this region discovered a dry cave/rock shelter with human remains. Only…
Archaeology: A Quest for Gold
On June 7, 1576, Captain Martin Frobisher took command of an expedition to the New World. It was the first voyage attempted by an Englishman in search of the elusive…
Archaeology: The Myth of Masada
Although almost twenty-five years have passed since the end of Israel's most ambitious archaeological undertaking, the name of this site, Masada, still exerts romantic appeal. For many Israelites and visitors…
Archaeology: Athens - Daughter of Egypt
Was Cleopatra black? Was Socrates? Did Egyptian armies conquer ancient Greece, thus setting the cradle of Western civilization in motion? Is this wishful thinking on the part of historical revisionists...or…

Related videos

Dawn of Humanity
Part of the Series: NOVA
NOVA and National Geographic present exclusive access to a unique discovery of ancient remains. Located in an almost inaccessible chamber deep in a South African cave, the site required recruiting a special team of experts slender enough to wriggle down a vertical, pitch-dark, seven-inch-wide passage. Most fossil discoveries of human…
Decoding Neanderthals
Part of the Series: NOVA
Over 60,000 years ago, the first modern humans--people physically identical to us today--left their African homeland and entered Europe, then a bleak and inhospitable continent in the grip of the Ice Age. But when they arrived, they were not alone: the stocky, powerfully built Neanderthals had already been living there…
NOVA: Becoming Human - Unearthing Our Earliest Ancestors
PBS
Nothing is more fascinating to us than, well, us. Where did we come from? What makes us human? An explosion of recent discoveries sheds light on these questions, and NOVA's comprehensive, three-part special, "Becoming Human," examines what the latest scientific research reveals about our hominid relatives--putting together the pieces of…
The Triunfante - The Discovery and Restoration of an 18th Century Warship
What's the process of retrieving a sunken ship and preparing it for display in a museum? How do archaeologists work underwater? One of the biggest wrecks ever discovered in Spain was the 'Triunfante', sunk during a French siege in 1795. We follow the process from its discovery to its display…
First Steps
Episode 1 of NOVA: Becoming Human
Where did we come from? What makes us human? An explosion of recent discoveries sheds light on these questions, and NOVA's comprehensive, three-part special, "Becoming Human," examines what the latest scientific research reveals about our hominid relatives. Part 1, "First Steps," examines the factors that caused us to split from…
Birth of Humanity
Episode 2 of NOVA: Becoming Human
In "Birth of Humanity," the second part of the three-part series "Becoming Human," NOVA investigates the first skeleton that really looks like us-"Turkana Boy"-an astonishingly complete specimen of Homo erectus found by the famous Leakey team in Kenya. These early humans are thought to have developed key innovations that helped…
Last Human StandingĀ 
Episode 3 of NOVA: Becoming Human
In "Last Human Standing," the final program of the three-part series "Becoming Human," NOVA examines the fate of the Neanderthals, our European cousins who died out as modern humans spread from Africa into Europe during the Ice Age. Did modern humans interbreed with Neanderthals or exterminate them? The program explores…
The Origins of Modern Archaeology
Begin to investigate what archaeologists actually do, the nature and scope of their work, and popular misconceptions about the field. As an introduction to the course, trace the colorful history of archaeology from its beginnings with the ancient Babylonian king Nabonidus to archaeological luminaries of the 20th century.
Excavating Pompeii and Herculaneum
Travel to the iconic sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum in Italy--Roman towns that were famously destroyed by the 79 A.D. eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Learn about the history of their excavation, and witness the astonishing preservation of buildings, objects, and human remains. Delve deeper to discover fascinating details of ancient…
Schliemann and His Successors at Troy
Follow the exploits of Heinrich Schliemann, a 19th-century amateur archaeologist who was determined to find the site of Homer's Troy. Learn about his dig through nine stratified cities, the astonishing finds, and the intense debates concerning which city was the actual Troy. Trace subsequent work at the site and examine…
Early Archaeology in Mesopotamia
Explore the history of phenomenal finds in Mesopotamia, beginning with the 19th-century unearthing of the great Assyrian palaces at Nimrud and Ninevah, with their libraries of cuneiform texts. Also contemplate the 20th-century discovery of the dazzling treasures of the famous "Death Pits of Ur."
How Do Archaeologists Know Where to Dig?
This lecture uncovers the methodology archaeologists use in looking for sites. Get acquainted with the uses of remote sensing technologies, such as LiDAR and ground penetrating radar, which enable archaeologists to visualize objects obscured by vegetation and soil. Then investigate ground surveys--reconnaissance done by carefully walking potential sites--which reveal vital…