The Birth of a Nation

The Birth of a Nation
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Comments (10)

Anonymous picture
Alex

"inspired African-Americans to move into filmmaking as a way to offer alternative images and stories" is such a horribly racist euphemism for "this film was so racist and horrible that it inspired many people to attempt to tell the actual story."

Mina avatar
Mina

It's so important to understand how influential this film was in shaping an American conscience in the early 1900s. It fueled the 2nd coming of the KKK, and it perpetuated the criminalization of the black man even to today. Aside from the garish overuse of blackface, it's an important annal ...Read more

Anonymous picture
Virginia

I have not watched this movie, but I have heard about it probably all of my life. I am glad to know that it is available on Kanopy so that I will be able to watch it, finally. As an African-American, I consider viewing this movie to be a continuation of my education. Though I anticipate ...Read more

Anonymous picture
Edward

Yes it is racist. Yes it is important. Ignoring it will not erase it's problematic history nor the history of racism in this country. We must watch it with a critical eye and understand the history that surrounds it. And we must understand it's place not only in film history but in the ...Read more

Alex avatar
Alex

Do not watch this racist film. I don't care how "important" it is. It's racist garbage.

Anonymous picture
Johnny

If you really think watching this film will make you racist, you probably have deeper problems that not watching the film won't solve. Nothing wrong with appreciating the artistic merit of this masterpiece.

Anonymous picture
James

Oh piss off you pearl clutching ninny.

Anonymous picture
James

Maybe we should burn it, right? And then you can get that applause and pat on the back from black people you so desperately desire.

Anonymous picture
Hector

It's not important; it's essential. Any filmmaker or film critic, regardless of race, will defend that aspect of the film. It basically invented the language of Cinema.

Anonymous picture
Agi

Racial history...told upside down...

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