Eating in the Early Industrial Revolution

Eating in the Early Industrial Revolution
Show More

Related videos

Papal Rome and the Spanish Golden Age
Here, explore the rise of distinct regional and national cuisines, focusing on Italy and Spain. Review the monumental culinary writings of Bartolomeo Scappi, bringing together specialty dishes from all of Italy. Then study excerpts from two classic books of Spanish cookery as they vividly evoke Spain's rich food culture.
Food Imperialism around the World
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, European colonialism expanded across the entire globe as a form of economic empire building. Grasp how Western powers came to control massive production of export crops in nonindustrialized countries, and how political maneuvering enabled large companies to dominate global markets in foodstuffs.
Religion and the Early Revolution
Shift your attention from politics to the Catholic Church, which was at the heart of local communities throughout France. Despite an overall decline in religion in the 18th century, revolutionaries were playing with fire as they sought to reform the church, and their actions divided the country.
Women’s Rights in the Early Revolution
Women had no official political role in the Old Regime, but the Revolution raised the question of women's rights and their place in the public sphere. Find out how two of the era's key feminists--Condorcet, a male mathematician, and Olympe de Gouges, a female writer--framed the demand for women's rights,…
Elizabethan England, Puritans, Country Food
English cookery's unflattering reputation conceals a rich and varied culinary past. Consider the religious and political factors that produced a "schizophrenic" gastronomy, contrasting native and foreign influences, courtly and country cooking. Learn about the wide range of British foods, and compare recipes using odd, baroque embellishments with ideologies promoting simple,…
First Restaurants, Chefs, and Gastronomy
European culinary art blossomed in the 18th and 19th centuries. Learn about the West's first true restaurants in 18th-century Paris and the formalized structure of meals served in multiple courses. Follow the exploits of four of the first celebrity chefs and the development of "gastronomy"--the science and art of eating…
The French Revolution - The Bastille
The setting is Paris, the date July 14, 1789. By dramatically re-creating the reality of that day and that year -- including mass hunger, crushing taxes, and resentment against France's rulers -- this program shows what leads the common people of Paris to a desperate act of violence: the storming…
The French Revolution - The Terror
Focusing on both humanity's idealism and its capacity for violence, this program dramatizes the ways in which the noble motives and legitimate causes of the French Revolution managed to spiral into a reign of terror, as the revolutionaries' original goals become overshadowed by the radical tactics of Robespierre and other…
1455—Gutenberg’s Print Revolution
Trace how Johannes Gutenberg's introduction of a press with movable type sparked a print revolution, becoming a key factor in the Protestant Reformation, the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the standardization of vernacular languages.
American Revolution and the Economic Crisis
Explore the economic problems of France in the 1780s. The nation was deeply in debt, due to war with Britain and participating in the American Revolution. The opening of free trade hit the textile market and caused high unemployment. Finally, years of poor harvests and famine spurred grain riots.
The Revolution and the Colonies
Turn to the French colonies and ask what the Revolution meant in places such as Saint-Domingue, the colony that would soon become the independent nation of Haiti. Did the Declaration of the Rights of Man apply to free people of color? Would the Revolution abolish the slave trade? These questions…
Revolution in Crisis—Summer 1793
Witness the Jacobins' struggle to hold the republic together. French Federalists wanted local power, especially in the south and in Normandy. Although their revolt never gained traction, it stunned Jacobins in Paris. Another dramatic calamity came in July, with the actions of a woman named Charlotte Corday.