Elevating Your Perspective: Photos from Above

Elevating Your Perspective: Photos from Above
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Editing, Culling, and Critiquing Your Photos
Once you're done shooting, it's time to sit down and edit. But this final lesson isn't about post-production on your computer. Instead, it's about visually critiquing your photographs--their backgrounds, lighting, focus, sense of place--and culling them to find the few that truly capture what you want to say.
Drive-By Photography: Travel Photos
When you're traveling by car, boat, or plane, you're often not in control of what you can photograph. However, you can still use the photographer's expert eye to get interesting shots. Journey with Mr. Melford to fascinating international locales and learn how to turn impossible situations into rewarding challenges.
Five Ideas for Successful Landscape Photos
Mr. Melford leaves you with five all-important ideas on making sure the next landscape photos you take are unforgettable ones. Using more work from his extensive portfolio, he shares inspirational advice on finding your own style, surrounding yourself with art, and getting out there into the natural world.
Taking Photos under and around Water
Underwater photography is tricky, expensive, and often requires bulky special equipment. But there are certain strategies anyone can use to capture great photographs in aquatic environments. In this lesson, experiment with underwater shots (and have some fun!) using everyday tools like smartphones and a 10-gallon aquarium.
Above- and Below-Surface Waterscapes
How do expert landscape photographers use water as their subject or as a compositional element? What does it take to capture the dramatic spectacle of a waterfall? Why is ice a great element for finding abstract patterns? How can you take interesting underwater photographs without investing in expensive camera housings?
Art Photography: Perspective and Illusions
Art photography can be lyrical, fun, dark, or surprising--but it's always about going beyond the obvious. Follow Professor Sartore on several shoots and discover how to take photos with a more artistic eye, how to playfully deceive viewers--and how to do it all without the aid of digital post production.
Big Results from Little Lights
Professor Sartore shows you how to effectively wield the small lights that come with basic cameras. What happens when you take the flash off your camera? Diffuse it with a tissue? Play around with shutter speeds? As you'll discover, you can get big photographic results from these little lights.
Getting Your Best Wildlife Photo
Finish the course with three different experiences capturing photos of exotic birds-from their perspective. Along the way, learn how everything you've explored in previous lectures comes together to produce what Mr. Laman considers some of the best images he'll ever make.
Landscape Photographer, Landscape Artist
Start your photographic adventure by grounding yourself in the essence of great landscape photography. How is it like fly fishing? What artists and photographers have influenced Mr. Melford's own work? What three elements and tools do photographers need to capture breathtaking shots of the natural world?
Seeing the Way the Camera Sees
Shutter speed, depth of field, and ISO (a camera's sensitivity to light). Discover how these technical concepts work with one another to form the foundation of powerful landscape photos. Also, learn how to sketch "a shot with your mobile phone to see if it's worth pursuing."
What’s in My Bag?
Every image in these lectures was captured with equipment found in Mr. Melford's backpack. Peer inside the landscape photographer's bag and discover when to use essential tools including cable releases, different lenses (such as the perfect landscape lens) and polarizing filters (which take the haze out of sky and water).
Four Kinds of Light in Landscapes
Every worthwhile landscape photo has three elements that make it powerful: composition, light, and content. Among the many topics you'll cover in this lecture are compositional aspects (such as leading lines and frames within frames) and the four kinds of light (including diffused light and incremental weather light).