Engineering and Technology in Your World

Engineering and Technology in Your World
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Your House as an Engineered System
Episode 2 of Everyday Engineering
In the first of four lectures on your house as a technological system, review the eight engineered subsystems that go into modern dwellings. Then discover the miracle of building codes, which ensure that every new house is safe, constructible, and reasonably economical without involving an engineer in each design.
Cellular Phone Technology
Episode 22 of Everyday Engineering
Why is cell phone service sometimes so unpredictable? Get inside the cellular network to learn how clever engineering makes a surprisingly large number of two-way conversations possible over a very narrow broadcast spectrum. Also see how the system leads to dead spots, dropped calls, and other familiar cell phone hassles.
Converging Technologies
In 1994 it would have taken about seven days to send someone a copy your holiday snaps. Now using a digital camera and email it takes about ten minutes. This fast-moving documentary takes us on a whistle-stop tour of the world of convergence. TECHNOLOGY CHANGE: In the early days computers…
Nanotechnology: The World Beyond Micro
Nanotechnology: The World Beyond Micro explores the world of nano dimensions and a growing number of engineered nanomaterials. The video looks at how the property of materials changes due to the effects of a high surface to volume ratio and quantum mechanics. Viewers are taken to industrial sites to see…
Understanding the World's Greatest Structures - Science and Innovation from Antiquity to Modernity Course
The Giza pyramids. Brunelleschi's dome. The Brooklyn Bridge. Each of these structures is iconic. They are visited by millions of people each year because they provoke a sense of awe and wonder. They are as beautiful to behold as they are fascinating to study: just how did the engineers who…
One World Trade Center
Part of the Series: Super Skyscrapers
One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the western hemisphere and a famous modern landmark, is engineered to be the safest and strongest skyscraper ever built. This episode follows the final year of exterior construction, culminating with the milestone of reaching the symbolic height of 1,776 feet. For head…
Space Robots in Orbit and on Other Worlds
Episode 17 of Robotics Series
Find out how space missions have pushed us to the limits of what autonomous robots can do. Central to this lecture are several fascinating robots, including Robonaut 2 (a humanoid robot working on the International Space Station) and the rovers Spirit and Opportunity, who are helping us better understand the…
Titans Of Steam - Including The Flying Scotsman
The magnificent workhourses of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway steam while engines such as "The Flying Scotsman" still ride the London and North Eastern Railway. A must have for all train enthusiasts.
Learning to See and Understand Structure
How are ideas for buildings, bridges, and towers transformed from sketches to concrete reality? What are the three essential qualities that make a structure great? What's the difference between seeing a structure and actually understanding it?
Egypt and Greece: Pyramids to the Parthenon
Embark on your tour of different types of structures from around the world and across time. Your first stop: ancient Egypt, and the surprisingly complex engineering of pyramids, including the Great and Red pyramids. Your second stop: ancient Greece, where you visit the domed Treasury of Atreus and break down…
The Glory of Rome in Arches and Vaults
Learn why the arch is the principal structural feature of ancient Rome. Your detailed case studies range from simple bridges such as the Pont St. Martin and triumphal arches such as the Arch of Titus to massive aqueducts like the Pont du Gard and majestic public spaces like the Baths…
The Rise and Fall of the Gothic Cathedral
Gothic cathedrals are lasting testaments to the power of a series of sweeping architectural developments in medieval Europe. After examining the roots of Gothic cathedrals in their Romanesque predecessors, focus on several structural innovations: including flying buttresses and pointed arches: at work in places such as France's Chartres Cathedral.