Etruscan Legacy in the Roman World

Etruscan Legacy in the Roman World
Show More

Related videos

The Etruscan World Falls Apart
Episode 22 of The Mysterious Etruscans
Many people assume that Etruscan culture simply died after the rise of Rome, but in truth, the culture lived on several centuries into Roman rule. Trace the history of the Etruscans' final years, from the invasion of Rome to various resistance and revival movements to their eventual integration into the…
Between the Greeks and Romans
Meet the Etruscans. Although you may not know much about them, this opening lecture quickly shows how they served as a conduit between the Greeks and the Romans, influencing much of what we think of as Western civilization. Begin by surveying their world to gain context for this mysterious people.
Lost Cities of Tuscany
Although Etruscan cities no longer survive, we can learn much by studying the geography and the foundations of cities that were built over the Etruscan developments. Explore three Etruscan cities to find out how they were designed, and see what urban development tells us about the people and their impact…
Who Founded Rome?
Much of Rome's geography, architecture, and artistic inscriptions suggest strong Etruscan influence. After discussing three Etruscan kings who ruled Rome, Professor Tuck reviews the evidence--particularly in some of the city's prominent temples--that Rome was, in fact, largely founded as an Etruscan city.
Etruscan Cities of the Dead
Step into the Etruscan necropolis--a literal city of the dead--which tells us much about how the culture viewed the afterlife, social class, and more. In this first of three lectures on the dead, you'll visit several ancient tombs to find out about how this mysterious people lived--and how their culture…
Etruscan Burial and Mourning
Funeral rites are some of the most conservative components of a culture. Because they change so slowly, we can learn much from looking at a society's funerals. Here, examine Etruscan tomb paintings to learn about their religious rituals, from which we can deduce much of their beliefs, cultural priorities, and…
Etruscan Afterlife
Round out your study of the Etruscan view of the dead and the afterlife by examining wall paintings. Reflect on some of the key symbols around the transition from the living to the dead--including divers, underworld guides, and kings. Then consider how the Etruscan afterlife compared to Greek beliefs and…
Etruscan Gods and Goddesses
Shift your attention from the afterlife to survey Etruscan gods and goddesses. Learn about their pantheon and see how their deities compare to Greek and Roman gods, and consider what these deities indicate about the Etruscan worldview. See how collective action among the deities mirrored the culture's government, family life,…
Divination: The Will of the Gods
One of the longest-lasting Etruscan legacies is divination, which had a profound influence on Rome. Venture into the Etruscan cosmos and find out how the interpretation of entrails, the flight of birds, and portents such as lightning strikes influenced their world. Then turn to blood sacrifices and other rituals designed…
Sanctuaries and Sacred Places
Sanctuaries reflect Etruscan religious beliefs and offer critical insight into their culture and politics. Examine the placement and design of several key sanctuaries, and contrast them with Greek temples. After reflecting on the geography of religious spaces, Professor Tuck turns to religious art and sculpture.
Etruscan Myths, Legends, and Heroes
Episode 10 of The Mysterious Etruscans
While much of their art incorporates Greek elements--confusing archaeologists for decades--the Etruscans have their own distinct myths and legends. Here, delve into some of those stories and meet heroes such as the Vipinas brothers, who were a pair of folk heroes rooted in history. Explore the relationship between myth and…
Greek Myth: Etruscan Tombs and Temples
Episode 11 of The Mysterious Etruscans
Between the 7th and 3rd centuries BC, the Etruscans imported thousands of pieces of Greek pottery, and this ubiquity influenced much of their own art. Study the urns, tomb paintings, and other artworks to uncover how the Etruscans incorporated and reinterpreted Greek myths for their own purposes.