Is Exercise Good for Your Health?

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In an Emergency, Protect Yourself First
Doctors are commanded to do no harm to their patients. What's equally important is protecting themselves in those rare instances where a patient may do them harm. Get an inside look at how emergency doctors handle dangerous situations, including a patient acting violently and a patient suffering from a highly…
Triage in Emergency Medicine
Start the course learning about the first critical step of emergency care: triage. When faced with a waiting room full of patients, how does a capable emergency department doctor decide whom to treat first? What happens when a patient's condition changes? Or when more patients show up?
Emergency Medicine Means Thinking Fast
Dr. Benaroch takes you along with an ambulance crew to give you a three-dimensional understanding of emergency care as experienced by first responders. Topics covered in this lecture include the ABCs of a rapid scan, appropriate bystander response, and the "rule of 9" for estimating burn size.
Emergency Medicine Means Thinking Again
Welcome to the night shift at an emergency department, where anything can happen. Through the patient cases in this lecture, you'll get a deeper understanding of how emergency doctors think twice about a young man having a heart attack, a college student who is vomiting, and an elderly man who…
The Story Is the Diagnosis
Discover how emergency doctors use OLD CAAAR: a simple mnemonic to accurately-- and quickly--pinpoint the location and characteristics of a patient's pains. Also, learn what happens when a doctor has to think fast and doesn't have the time to ask each of the OLD CAAAR questions.
Hidden Clues in the Emergency Department
Take a closer look at three emergency department cases--a urinary tract infection, a broken leg, and a bellyache--with a twist. How were these diagnoses determined? Not through expensive tests or advanced imaging, but through paying attention to the story, even when it isn't truthful.
Treat the Patient, Treat the Family
According to Dr. Benaroch, to best treat a patient, you sometimes have to treat the patient's family. See this principle in action through a 16-year-old complaining of chronic bronchitis and a 60-year-old found unresponsive with low blood sugar--both of whom have families to help support a doctor's efforts to diagnose…
Chest Pain
This lecture focuses on patients with chest pain, which might be either a sign of a mild illness or an actual heart attack. Why is it so difficult to identify every serious cause of chest pain? What questions should doctors--and patients!--ask? What's the difference between myocarditis, pneumothorax, and other medically…
Treat the Cause, Not the Symptom
Definitive emergency care requires, first and foremost, a diagnosis. Visit a community emergency department that shares space with an urgent care center, and learn how patients like a 2-year-old with a persistent cough and a 49-year-old with a stuffy nose illustrate the importance of treating the cause--not the symptoms.
Who Needs the Emergency Department?
Not all emergency department patients need to be there. In this lecture, meet several pairs of patients--each with the same symptoms, but only one of whom would be best served in the emergency department. Then, get some general tips for you to consider the next time you're contemplating going to…
Altered Mental Status
How do you handle patients in altered mental states, suffering from unusual thoughts and behaviors? How do you figure out their story and make an accurate diagnosis? Discover how, in cases like these, doctors rely more than ever on signs and clues from a patient's family and friends.
Simple Symptoms, Serious Illness
Discover why sometimes a quick patient history isn't enough to help diagnose a problem. In addition to walking you through patient cases, Dr. Benaroch offers insights into fascinating tools that help doctors uncover serious illnesses hidden behind basic symptoms, including complete blood count tests and air contrast enemas.