How Big Should Government Be?

How Big Should Government Be?
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The next three lectures address the big question: What is the nature of the mind? Start with the celebrated "hard problem" of consciousness: How does the brain produce the mind? Investigate two possible answers and explore why many philosophers consider both to be problematic.
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How Do We Encounter The World?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
How Do We Encounter the World? examines the views of Husserl, Heidegger, and others in which reality is a phenomenon of consciousness.