Humain, trop Humain

Janus Films (The Criterion Collection)
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In 1986, Louis Malle, himself a transplant to the United States, set out to investigate the ever-widening range of immigrant experience in America. Interviewing a variety of newcomers (from teachers to astronauts to doctors) in middle- and working-class communities from coast to coast, Malle paints a generous, humane portrait of…
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When he was cutting Phantom India, Louis Malle found that the footage shot in Calcutta was so diverse, intense, and unforgettable that it deserved its own film. The result, released theatrically, is at times shocking--a chaotic portrait of a city engulfed in social and political turmoil, edging ever closer to…
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In Louis Malle's captivating and philosophical My Dinner with Andre, actor and playwright Wallace Shawn sits down with friend and theater director Andre Gregory at an Upper West Side restaurant, and the two proceed into an alternately whimsical and despairing confessional on love, death, money, and all the superstition in…
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Grace and Virginia are young San Diego twins who speak unlike anyone else. With little exposure to the outside world, the two girls have created a private form of communication that's an amalgam of the distinctive English dialects they hear at home. Jean-Pierre Gorin's polyphonic nonfiction investigation of this phenomenon…
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Antonio Gaudi
Catalan architect Antonio Gaudi (1852-1926) designed some of the world's most astonishing buildings, interiors, and parks; Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara constructed some of the most aesthetically audacious films ever made. Here their artistry melds in a unique, enthralling cinematic experience. Less a documentary than a visual poem, Teshigahara's Antonio Gaudi…