Jan Vermeer

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The only child of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth was born on September 7 1533 in Greenwich Palace. From her accession in 1558 to her death in 1603, she was a great, beloved, feared, complex, contradictory ruler, and for many ever since she has remained England's most fascinating monarch.…
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A key figure in the Romantic Movement, Blake was emphatic about the origins of his compositions - he said they were inspired by visions. Blake's best work gives pictorial expression to a crucially important aspect of Romanticism, the need for a new religion.