Is Knowledge Possible?

Is Knowledge Possible?
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What Is the Best Way to Gain Knowledge?
Put empiricism to the test as the best way to acquire knowledge. Study the ideas of John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume, together with the response of Immanuel Kant, before settling on the most effective route to understanding the world as it is.
Do We Know What Knowledge Is?
Address a famous problem concerning the nature of knowledge, posed by contemporary philosopher Edmund Gettier. Use different thought experiments to test the traditional definition of knowledge. Discover firsthand the bafflement and enlightenment that comes from doing philosophy.
Is Reason The Source Of Knowledge?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
Is Reason the Source of Knowledge? presents the rationalism of Descartes and Leibnitz, the roots of rationalism in Plato and geometry, and the continuing debate over whether the mind alone can generate knowledge.
How Does Science Add To Knowledge?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
How Does Science Add to Knowledge? highlights the classic, Baconian inductivist view that grew out of the Scientific Revolution and challenges to that view posed by Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn. Includes consideration of Kuhn's views about the role that paradigm theories play in scientific revolutions.
Does Knowledge Depend On Experience?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
Does Knowledge Depend on Experience? focuses on the 17th and 18th Century empiricism of John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume, and the 20th Century empiricism and naturalism of W.V.O. Quine, who is interviewed.
The Big Questions of Philosophy
We have all pondered seemingly unanswerably but significant questions about our existence - the biggest of all being, "Why are we here?" Philosophy has developed over millennia to help us grapple with these essential intangibles. There is no better way to study the big questions in philosophy than to compare…
How Do We Do Philosophy?
The first four lectures of the course pose the big question: What is philosophy? Start by exploring the kinds of problems that philosophy addresses, the way philosophy works, and the distinction between philosophy and opinion. Discover that philosophy is arguably the most important pursuit there is.
Why Should We Trust Reason?
Hone your philosophical thinking by identifying the categories of fallacious reasoning that ensnare us all. Investigate examples of gut-thinking, confirmation bias, appealing to ignorance, the correlation fallacy, begging the question, and equivocation. Learn how to check your reasoning for flaws.
How Do We Reason Carefully?
Avoiding fallacious reasoning is just the beginning of philosophical thinking. Go deeper by studying the rules of deduction and induction. In the process, learn Aristotle's three axioms of logic, the difference between truth and validity, common mistakes in logical arguments, and why practically all scientific arguments are inductive.
How Do We Find the Best Explanation?
Explore the power of abduction, a form of induction also known as inference to the best explanation, that is used not only by philosophers, but also by doctors to make medical diagnoses and scientists to construct theories. Even Sherlock Holmes--the master of deduction--really practiced abductive inference.
What Is Truth?
Now begin a section of the course devoted to the big question: What is knowledge? Start with the problem of defining truth. Investigate three philosophical theories that attempt to pin down this elusive concept: pragmatism, coherentism, and the correspondence theory.
When Can We Trust Testimony?
In this section, put what you've learned to work by asking the big question: Can religious belief be justified? Start with Hume's argument that testimony can never justify a belief that a miracle has occurred. Analyze the flaws in Hume's reasoning, and think about whether his conclusion still holds.