Late Spring

Late Spring
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Comments (6)

Anonymous picture
Adrian

The first half is so slow -- almost made me stop watching. But the last 30 min is truly magnificent and emotional. Worth the wait & patience.

Anonymous picture
Ryan

Ozu's flms like those of Tarkovsky's can be something of an endurance test for those with sometimes short attention spans, but like Tarkovsky's films, you will be rewarded with viewing Ozu's and Late Spring is case in point, it's up there with Tokyo Story as being among his most powerful and ...Read more

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Anonymous

I liked it, but it was very dated. Think of it as a Japanese precursor to Wes Anderson but with a significant amount of realism

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Anonymous

Wes Anderson has gotten away with ripping off Ozu, Kaurismaki, Bergman, Bresson, Herzog, Buñuel, Ray, Kieslowski, Fassbinder, Antonioni, Godard, Wenders, Jarmusch, Fellini, and countless others for decades.
Audiences are kept ill-informed of his creative process of (1) digesting the ...Read more

Anonymous picture
Thom

"We all eat from the same cake" -Ingmar Bergman

Anonymous picture
Ryan

Boy you sound like a cranky, elitist old fart.

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