The Mathematics of Fractals
Episode 31 of Geometry

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Trigonometry through Right Triangles
Episode 17 of Geometry
The trig identities you explored in the last lecture go beyond circles. Learn how to define all of them just using triangles (expressed in the famous acronym SOHCAHTOA). Then, uncover how trigonometry is practically applied by architects and engineers to measure the heights of buildings.
Filling the Gap between Dimensions
Enter another dimension - a fractional dimension! First, hone your understanding of dimensionality by solving the riddle of Gabriel's horn, which has finite volume but infinite surface area. Then venture into the fractal world of Sierpinski's triangle, which has 1.58 dimensions, and the Menger sponge, which has 2.73 dimensions.
Equidistance—A Focus on Distance
Episode 12 of Geometry
You've learned how to find the midpoint between two points. But what if you have three points? Or four points? Explore the concept of equidistance and how it reveals even more about the properties of triangles and other shapes.
Visualizing Pascal's Triangle
Keep playing with the approach from the previous lecture, applying it to algebra problems, counting paths in a grid, and Pascal's triangle. Then explore some of the beautiful patterns in Pascal's triangle, including its connection to the powers of eleven and the binomial theorem.
The Classification of Triangles
Episode 15 of Geometry
Continue the work of classification with triangles. Find out what mathematicians mean when they use words like scalene, isosceles, equilateral, acute, right, and obtuse. Then, learn how to use the Pythagorean theorem to determine the type of triangle (even if you don't know the measurements of the angles).
Understanding Area
Episode 21 of Geometry
What do we mean when we say "area"? Explore how its definition isn't quite so straightforward. Then, work out the formula for the area of a triangle and see how to use that formula to derive the area of any other polygon.
The Pythagorean Theorem
Part of the Series: Algebra I
Because it involves terms raised to the second power, the famous Pythagorean theorem, a2 + b2 = c2, is actually a quadratic equation. Discover how techniques you have previously learned for analyzing quadratic functions can be used for solving problems involving right triangles.
Introduction to Scale
Episode 24 of Geometry
If you double the side-lengths of a shape, what happens to its area? If the shape is three-dimensional, what happens to its volume? In this lecture, you explore the concept of scale. You use this idea to re-derive one of our fundamental assumptions of geometry, the Pythagorean theorem, using the…
Graphing Rational Functions, Part 1
Part of the Series: Algebra I
Examine the distinctive graphs formed by rational functions, which may form vertical or horizontal curves that aren't even connected on a graph. Learn to identify the intercepts and the vertical and horizontal asymptotes of these fascinating curves.
The Mathematics of Symmetry
Episode 30 of Geometry
Human aesthetics seem to be drawn to symmetry. Explore this idea mathematically through the study of mappings, translations, dilations, and rotations--and see how symmetry is applied in modern-day examples such as cell phones.
Complex Numbers in Geometry
Episode 35 of Geometry
In lecture 6, you saw how 17th-century mathematician Rene Descartes united geometry and algebra with the invention of the coordinate plane. Now go a step further and explore the power and surprises that come from using the complex number plane. Examine how using complex numbers can help solve several tricky…
Slope of a Line
Part of the Series: Algebra I
Explore the concept of slope, which for a given straight line is its rate of change, defined as the rise over run. Learn the formula for calculating slope with coordinates only, and what it means to have a positive, negative, and undefined slope.