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Advanced Multiplication
Episode 11 of Secrets of Mental Math
Professor Benjamin shows you how to do enormous multiplication problems in your head, such as squaring three-digit and four-digit numbers; cubing two-digit numbers, and multiplying two-digit and three-digit numbers. While you may not frequently encounter these large problems, knowing how to mentally solve them cements your knowledge of basic mental…
Order of Operations
Part of the Series: Algebra I
The order in which you do simple operations of arithmetic can make a big difference. Learn how to solve problems that combine adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing, as well as raising numbers to various powers. These same concepts also apply when you need to simplify algebraic expressions, making it critical…
Intermediate Multiplication
Episode 7 of Secrets of Mental Math
Take mental multiplication to an even higher level. Professor Benjamin shows you five methods for accurately multiplying any two-digit numbers. Among these: the squaring method (when both numbers are equal), the close together method (when both numbers are near each other), and the subtraction method (when one number ends in…
Secrets of Mental Math
One key to expanding your math potential--whether you're a CEO or a high school student--lies in the power to perform mental calculations. Solving basic math problems in your head offers lifelong benefits including a competitive edge at work, a more active and sharper mind, and improved standardized test scores. Discover…
Go Forth and Multiply
Episode 3 of Secrets of Mental Math
Delve into the secrets of easy mental multiplication: Professor Benjamin's favorite mathematical operation. Once you've mastered how to quickly multiply any two-digit or three-digit number by a one-digit number, you've mastered the most fundamental operations of mental multiplication and added a vital tool to your mental math tool kit.
Operations and Polynomials
Part of the Series: Algebra I
Much of what you've learned about linear and quadratic expressions applies to adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing polynomials. Discover how the FOIL operation can be extended to multiplying large polynomials, and a version of long division works for dividing one polynomial by another.
Math in Your Head!
Episode 1 of Secrets of Mental Math
Dive right into the joys of mental math. First, learn the fundamental strategies of mental arithmetic (including the value of adding from left to right, unlike what you do on paper). Then, discover how a variety of shortcuts hold the keys to rapidly solving basic multiplication problems and finding squares.
Solving “Impossible” Puzzles
Try your hand at some classic puzzles that have been driving people crazy for centuries involving sliding blocks, jumping pegs, and blinking lights--each of which deals heavily with odd or even numbers. Once you've learned some handy mathematical concepts and tools for solving these puzzles, these fun and exciting games…
Rational Expressions, Part 2
Part of the Series: Algebra I
Continuing your exploration of rational expressions, try your hand at multiplying and dividing them. The key to solving these complicated-looking equations is to proceed one step at a time. Close the lesson with a problem that brings together all you've learned about rational functions.
Memorizing Numbers
Episode 9 of Secrets of Mental Math
Think that memorizing long numbers sounds impossible? Think again. Investigate a fun: and effective: way to memorize numbers using a phonetic code in which every digit is given a consonant sound. Then practice your knowledge by trying to memorize the first 24 digits of pi, all of your credit card…
The Joy of Math - The Big Picture
Episode 1 of The Joy of Mathematics
Professor Benjamin introduces the ABCs of math appreciation: The field can be loved for its applications, its beauty and structure, and its certainty. Most of all, mathematics is a source of endless delight through creative play with numbers.
Elementary Math Isn't Elementary
Discover why all numbers are interesting and why 0.99999... is nothing less than the number 1. Learn that your intuition about breaking spaghetti noodles is probably wrong. Finally, see how averages - from mileage to the Dow Jones Industrial Average - can be deceptive.