Screening Room Series

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23 videos in this collection

Screening Room with Derek Lamb
Derek Lamb appeared on Screening Room in June 1973 with over a dozen films and film clips that demonstrated a wide range of animation techniques, including The Rocket, The Great…
Screening Room with George Griffin
Independent animator George Griffin has dedicated himself to the pursuit of animation as an art form. Originally from Tennessee, he became a pivotal figure of New York's experimental film scene…
Screening Room with Hollis Frampton
A major figure in the American experimental film movement of the 1960s and '70s and a widely published theorist, Hollis Frampton made such acclaimed and influential films as Zorns Lemma,…
Screening Room with Bruce Baillie
Bruce Baillie appeared on Screening Room in April 1973 to screen and discuss the films:
  • On Sundays (excerpt, 11:40)
  • The Gymnasts (excerpt, 6:45)
  • To…
Screening Room with Caroline Leaf and Mary Beams
Caroline Leaf's animated work springs from her expert storytelling and pioneering animation techniques. One significant contribution to filmmaking is her technique of manipulating sand on a light-box, which she began…
Screening Room with Ed Emshwiller
Ed Emshwiller started out as an abstract expressionist painter and an award-winning science fiction illustrator before becoming a major figure in avant-garde cinema and the experimental film movement of the…
Screening Room with Emile de Antonio
Emile de Antonio (1919-1989), one of America's most influential political and avant-garde filmmakers, started making documentary films in the mid-1960s, and all his work had wide success in theatrical release.…
Screening Room with Hillary Harris
In March 1973, Hilary Harris visited Screening Room to screen and discuss his films:
  • Longhorns (full film, 4:32)
  • Highway (full film, 4:56)
  • Seawards the…
Screening Room with James Broughton
Often called "the father of West Coast independent cinema," James Broughton (1913-1999) considered himself to be, first and foremost, a poet. Writing poems and making films were, for Broughton, simply…
Screening Room with Jan Lenica
In addition to being a celebrated experimental animator, Jan Lenica (1928-2001) was a multi-talented artist known for his poetic and surreal graphic art in many forms. Whether working with film,…
Screening Room with John & Faith Hubley
John and Faith Hubley appeared on Screening Room in April 1973 to discuss and screen their films Eggs, The Hat, Children of the Sun, and Zuckerkandl. John and Faith Hubley…
Screening Room with John Whitney Sr.
Abstract computer animator, inventor and digital pioneer John Whitney, Sr. (1917-1995) is widely considered the "father of Computer Graphics." Whitney's films reveal his deep interest in technology as a means…
Screening Room with Jonas Mekas
Jonas Mekas - filmmaker, film critic, archivist, poet, lecturer and curator - is one of the leading figures of American avant-garde film and video. Born in Lithuania, he immigrated to…
Screening Room with Michael Snow
In March 1977 Michael Snow appeared on Screening Room. He discussed and screened excerpts from his film Rameau's Nephew by Diderot (Thanx to Dennis Young) by Wilma Schoen (10:48/18:57/7:29/0:55). Canadian…
Screening Room with Peter Hutton
Drawing on traditions of 19th-century landscape painting and still photography, Hutton's contemplative, meticulously composed films unfold as a series of tableaux separated by black leader. His work, primarily minimalist, silent…
Screening Room with Richard P. Rogers
Richard P. Rogers (1944-2001) was a renowned producer and director of nonfiction films, and a gifted teacher and mentor who taught filmmaking and photography for many years at S.U.N.Y., Purchase,…
Screening Room with Robert Breer
Since the 1950s, American animator Robert Breer has been well-known for his films exploring shape, color, perspective and motion. His work exhibits innovative graphic and dramatic interpretation as well as…
Screening Room with Robert Fulton
Robert Fulton appeared on Screening Room in April 1973 to screen and discuss Machu Pichu and Reality's Invisible. Fulton returned in April 1979 and screened excerpts from the films Street…
Screening Room with Standish Lawder & Stanley Cavell
A professor of art history and film, a photographer and an inventor, Standish Lawder has made truly experimental films by seeing what a predetermined idea about content, structure, or technique…
Screening Room with Suzan Pitt
Independent animator and painter Suzan Pitt, whose surreal and psychological films have gained her worldwide acclaim, continually pushes the boundaries of the animated form, sometimes working with live actors or…
Screening Room with Ricky Leacock
Ricky Leacock visited Screening Room on June 15, 1973, with Al Mecklenburg and Jon Rosenfeld. He demonstrates super-8 sync technology and screens excerpts from his films Republicans: The New Breed…
Screening Room with Les Blank
Beginning with The Blues Accordin' to Lightnin' Hopkins in 1969, Les Blank has become known for his films about indigenous southern music and various other topics. He has received numerous…
Screening Room with Jean Rouch
Jean Rouch appeared on Screening Room in July 1980 and screened Les Maitres Fous as well as several film excerpts including Rhythm of Work and Death of a Priest. Over…

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