Subject Pronouns and the Verb Ser

Subject Pronouns and the Verb Ser
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Direct Object Pronouns and Adverbs
Begin with additional vocabulary concerning food and drink, focusing on breakfast and lunch. Then study direct object pronouns (such as "them" in English), which replace direct object nouns to avoid redundancy, and learn their uses and placement in Spanish. Finally, encounter Spanish adverbs: common words used to modify verbs, adjectives,…
Indirect Object Pronouns
Continue working with vocabulary related to clothing, and practice describing clothing. Then study Spanish indirect object pronouns--pronouns that replace indirect objects--and learn verbs that commonly use them. Last, explore some additional strategies for learning and remembering new vocabulary.
Double Object Pronouns
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Demonstrative Adjectives & Pronouns
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Relative, Interrogative & Indefinite Pronouns
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Between You and Your Pronouns
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Begin with an important irregular verb: ir, meaning "to go". Conjugate ir in the present tense, and learn about its key uses in Spanish. Next, study and practice common Spanish interrogatives--words used in asking questions. Finish by looking at effective ways to remember new words and build vocabulary.
Expressions Using the Verb Tener
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The Verb εἰμί
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The most common mi verb is also one of the most irregular: to be. Study its forms, discovering that, as unpredictable as it appears, it is more regular than its English counterparts: I am, you are, he is. Then learn to count in Greek, and analyze lines 109-117 of the…