Submissions and Publishing Etiquette

Submissions and Publishing Etiquette
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Today’s Book Publishing Landscape
Take an in-depth look at the world of writing and getting published: the history of the business, the competition in the modern market, and the major and minor players in the industry. Clear up some common misconceptions about what it takes to become a published writer and get an overview…
The Book Publishing Contract
Episode 18 of How to Publish Your Book
If you get to the point of the process where publishing contracts are being drafted, it's important to understand the terminology and protect your rights. Examine the three areas of the contract to which you should pay close attention: the grant-of-rights clause, the reversion-of-rights clause, and the subsidiary rights clauses.…
The Self-Publishing Path: When and How
Episode 22 of How to Publish Your Book
Discuss the value of publishers, then review specific scenarios in which you may not need those benefits. When is self-publishing a viable option for your book? Get invaluable advice on steps you should take if you choose to self-publish, and learn about the tools you will need to succeed.
Principles of Self-Publishing Success
Episode 23 of How to Publish Your Book
Understand the vital role metadata plays in positioning your self-published book for success. Examine pricing models to attract a large audience that is hesitant about purchasing from an unknown entity. Learn tips to garner reviews that will help your book get noticed.
Becoming a Great Essayist
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Steal, Adopt, Adapt: Where Essays Begin
First, learn what the essay is--and what it is not. See how the practice of writing essays has evolved over centuries yet has remained versatile, and examine the many uses of essays across the ages. Numerous essayists find starting out to be the most daunting part of writing. Professor Cognard-Black…
Memory Maps and Your Essay’s Direction
Much like a photographer who can change the angle, lens, lighting, and focus of a scene to evoke emotion from viewers, a writer colors an essay with his or her individual perspective simply by relaying his or her truth of it. This lecture focuses on looking at the world around…
Secrets, Confession, and a Writer’s Voice
One of the most remarkable consequences of essay writing is the illuminating insights you discover about yourself. The nature of the essay doesn't allow for plot building or outlines--you simply sit and write, which means the story takes its own direction. Professor Cognard-Black encourages this process of discovery and shares…
The Skeptical Essayist: Conflicting Views
Many essayists find themselves doing an about-face as they write, sometimes because they may not have fully researched or thought through an idea before making claims about it. Essays that present conflicting views are not uncommon; Socrates would commonly switch sides in order to test all parts of an argument,…
The Reasonable Essayist: Artistic Proofs
Professor Cognard-Black introduces you to artistic proofs, which are grounded in your expertise and colored by your own observations and experiences. The most important artistic proof in any essay is ethos--the writer's ethical appeal or credibility. She demonstrates how to effectively use ethos along with logos or rationality to bring…
The Unreasonable Essayist: Strategic Irony
After discussing the importance of presenting a reasonable essay, Professor Cognard-Black explores the world of unreasonable essays, often written for the sake of humor or irony, or to be provocative, such as Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal." You'll explore an example of an essay that showcases conflicting views yet remains…
The Empathetic Essayist: Evoking Emotion
Revisit Aristotle to master the craft of pathos--being able to express empathy for the subject of any essay. Learn how to elicit emotions from your readers while remaining authentic and not manipulative, cliched, or contrived. Reflect on honest and moving uses of language from Maxine Hong Kingston and Barack Obama,…