From Temple to Basilica—Timber Roof Systems

From Temple to Basilica—Timber Roof Systems
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Comments (2)

Anonymous picture
daisy

1.) Roof structures were hidden by stone on top and a wood below it
2.) It influences the form and function of a colonnaded temple
3.) Influenced and allowed for new architecture (the basilica)
4.) Has rectangular sockets
5.) Antefixes are used to hide the exposed ...Read more

Anonymous picture
Savannah

Savannah Diaz: 1) Roof structures were entirely hidden. 2) A series of rectangular sockets provide invaluable clues of the sizes of the roof timbers. 3) Stone stairways provide stairways to ground walls. 4) Cornesses tell us that rafters must extend from each corness to the ridge beam. 5) ...Read more

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