Verbs in the Imperfect Tense
Episode 9 of Greek 101

Verbs in the Imperfect Tense
Show More

Related videos

Verbs in the Present Tense
Episode 5 of Greek 101
Greek verbs can be described in terms of person, number, tense, voice, and mood. In this lesson, focus on verbs that are present active indicative. Learn that voice, person, and number are indicated by endings on the verb base. For the present tense, these are called primary endings.
Verbs in the Future & Aorist Tenses
Episode 10 of Greek 101
Learn two new tenses: the future and aorist. In the process, encounter the concept of principal parts, which are indispensable for recognizing different tenses. Concentrate on the first three principal parts for regular verbs (present and imperfect, future, and aorist). Also inspect some irregular verbs.
Regular -μι Verbs in the Active
Episode 32 of Greek 101
Bring your study of Greek verbs to a close by focusing on an important class of verbs that end in mi in the first principal part. There aren't many such mi verbs, but they are useful and common, and they appear frequently in compounds.
Regular -μι Verbs in the Middle/Passive
Episode 33 of Greek 101
Extend your exploration of mi verbs, studying the middle passive, which is more regular than the active voice covered in the previous lesson. Note examples of mi verbs in Luke 22:19, which depicts a moment from the Last Supper, and lines 86-100 of the Iliad.
Review of Regular -μι Verbs
Episode 34 of Greek 101
Search for the features that distinguish mi verbs from the verb forms encountered earlier in the course, whose first principal part ends in o. Resume your study of the Lord's Prayer, discovering two mi verb aorist commands. Then read lines 101-108 of the Iliad, which open with a mi verb…
Irregular Verbs & Tips for Further Study
Episode 36 of Greek 101
Learn two more irregular verbs, to go and to know, seeing them at work in sentences from John and Matthew. Then complete your last passage from the Iliad, lines 118-125, and consider strategies for continuing your Greek studies--whether you want to dig deeper into Homer and the New Testament, or…
Aorist & Imperfect Middle/Passive
Episode 17 of Greek 101
In the previous lesson, you learned the primary middle/passive endings, which are used for the present and future tenses. Now compare these to the secondary middle/passive endings, which are used for past tenses. Then read lines 11-16 of the Iliad, learning new rules for scanning dactylic hexameter.
The Verb εἰμί
Episode 35 of Greek 101
The most common mi verb is also one of the most irregular: to be. Study its forms, discovering that, as unpredictable as it appears, it is more regular than its English counterparts: I am, you are, he is. Then learn to count in Greek, and analyze lines 109-117 of the…
Greek 101 - Learning an Ancient Language
Discover beauty that no translation can capture, and get direct access to a remarkable heritage. Learn ancient Greek with an innovative professor using two great masterworks: Homer's Iliad and the New Testament. Covering the topics in a typical year of introductory college-level ancient Greek, Greek 101 exposes you to authentic…
The Greek Alphabet & Pronunciation
Episode 1 of Greek 101
Learn the 24 letters of the Greek alphabet using the restored classical pronunciation, recognizing that there was some variation in pronunciation in the ancient world. Practice the pairings of vowels called diphthongs, and sound out a selection of words that you will soon be reading in sentences.
First-Declension Nouns
Episode 2 of Greek 101
Discover that Greek nouns have gender and their endings supply a host of information, such as whether the case is nominative, genitive, dative, or accusative--a function usually performed by word order or prepositions in English. Begin with the eight noun endings of the primarily feminine first declension.
Basic Rules of Greek Accentuation
Episode 3 of Greek 101
Invented over two thousand years ago by Aristophanes of Byzantium, head of the Library of Alexandria, accents are important clues to the pronunciation of Greek words, and they often provide other crucial information. Learn the rules for the three types of accents: acute, grave, and circumflex.