When Can We Trust Testimony?

When Can We Trust Testimony?
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Anonymous picture
Ferdi

Good overview of Hume's take on miracles and potential objections. My main take-away: if an established natural law has been broken, perhaps we were merely mistaken about that law to begin with.

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